Study confirms that teens living in US states allowing medical marijuana smoke less cannabis

Study confirms that teens living in US states allowing medical marijuana smoke less cannabis
Feb
15
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According to a large-scale study of American high school students, legalizing medicinal marijuana has actually led to a drop in cannabis use among teenagers.

The study, published today in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse used the results of an anonymous survey given to more than 800,000  across 45 states to calculate the number of teens who smoke cannabis.

It found that the number of teenage cannabis smokers was 1.1% less in states that had enacted medical  laws (MML) compared to those that hadn't, even when accounting for other important variables such as tobacco and alcohol policies, economic trends, youth characteristics and state demographics.

"We found that for every group of 100 adolescents, one fewer will be a current user of marijuana following the enactment of medical marijuana laws," says Dr. Rebekah Levine Coley, a Professor of psychology at Boston College, who led the study.

"When we looked at particular subgroups of adolescents, this reduction became even more pronounced. For example 3.9% less Black and 2.7% less Hispanic youths now use marijuana in states with MML".

As the survey was administered over a period of 16 years, the researchers were able to compare the changes in teenager's marijuana use in states that adopted MML with those that hadn't, allowing them to more precisely pinpoint the effects of the legislation. Intriguingly, the study found that the longer the laws had been in place, the greater the reduction in teen marijuana use.

The results shine a light on an important debate taking place in America about the relative benefits and risks of decriminalizing marijuana.

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